IleoCecal Valve Syndrome

The below Article describes Ileocecal Valve Syndrome. Dr Cliff Utilizes many methods to clear IVS primarily with AK and nutrtion or Homeopathy. Once the IVS syndrome is cleared, we often find recurrent low back, shoulder, and flu symptoms pain may disappear.

When the ileocecal valve is stuck open waste products can back up into the small intestine (much like a backed up kitchen sink drain) disturbing your digestion and also creating unhealthy toxins that are absorbed into the body. Also, if the ileocecal valve is stuck closed waste products are prevented or constricted from passing into the large intestine.

Unfortunately, this disorder is often overlooked by the medical profession. A dysfunctional ileocecal valve can result in a combination of symptoms.

Ileocecal Valve Syndrome Symptoms

Right shoulder pain
Right side pelvic pain
Low back pain
Pain surrounding heart
Flu symptoms
Tinnitus
Nausea

Syncope / Near syncope
Headache
Bad breath
ace pallor
Dark circles under eyes
Dizziness
Bowel disturbances (diarrhea / constipation)
Causes of Ileocecal Valve Syndrome
Dehydration
Emotional upsets

How you eat (overeating, eating too frequently, eating too quickly, eating foods you are sensitive to, under-chewing your food)

Foods you eat (carbonated drinks, alcohol, caffeine, chocolate, raw foods, hot spicy foods)
Treating Ileocecal Valve Syndrome

Treatment options for ileocecal valve syndrome are
chiropractic adjustments, applied kinesiology, homeopathy, and alternative diet.

Temporary Diet Recommendations During Treatment

For two to three weeks--Avoid:

Roughage foods--such as: popcorn, nuts, potato chips, pretzels, seeds, whole grains

Spicy foods--such as: chili powder, hot peppers, salsas, black and cayenne pepper, paprika, cloves, cinnamon

Also eliminate-- liquors, alcoholic drinks, cocoa, chocolate, caffeine products

The transverse colon is variable in position, depending largely on the distention of the stomach, but usually is located in the subcostal plane; that is, at the level of the 10th rib. On the left side of the abdomen it ascends to the bend called the splenic flexure, which may make an indentation in the spleen. The transverse colon is bound to the diaphragm opposite the 11th rib by a fold of peritoneum.

The descending colon passes down and in front of the left kidney and the left side of the posterior abdominal wall to the iliac crest, the upper border of the hipbone. The descending colon is more likely than the ascending colon to be surrounded by peritoneum.

The sigmoid colon is commonly divided into iliac and pelvic parts. The iliac colon stretches from the crest of the ilium, or upper border of the hipbone, to the inner border of the psoas
muscle, which lies in the left iliac fossa. Like the descending colon, the iliac colon is usually covered by peritoneum. The pelvic colon lies in the true pelvis (lower part of the pelvis) and forms one or two loops, reaching across to the right side of the pelvis and then bending back and, at the midline, turning sharply downward to the point where it becomes the rectum.

The layers that make up the wall of the colon are similar in some respects to those of the small bowel; there are distinct differences, however. The external aspect of the colon differs markedly from that of the small bowel because of features known as the haustra, taeniae, and appendices epiploicae.

The mucous membrane of the colon has a characteristic structure. It lacks the villi and the folds known as plicae circulares characteristic of the small intestine. It contains many solitary lymphatic nodules but no Peyer's patches. The surface epithelium is columnar, and there are many goblet cells. Characteristic of the colonic mucosa are deep tubular pits, increasing in depth toward the rectum.

It can be stated that every symptom in the human body is governed by metabolic enzymes. Cells receiving balanced nutrition, with a full variety of trace minerals, create their own enzymes and hormone potentials and therefore protect themselves against bacterial, Fungal and viral attack.

A body with high mineral assistance the body maintains a fluid electrolyte solution in its cells, osmotic equilibrium or pressure, moving fluid and water into and out of cells, which governs blood pressure, kidney function, nerve process and hydration.

By introducing Purified sea water into the colon, absorption through osmosis carries the Ionic Trace Minerals and Elements directly into the blood stream, supplying all the critical elements for cell division and regeneration in the body.

Dr Cliffs Staff 2011

(ArticlesBase SC #376913)

Article by Paul Fizgerald



Home treatment for the Ileo cecal valve syndrome in addiotnion to AK reflexology

Ileocecal Valve Massage

What? The ileocecal valve is a sphincter (circular muscle) which is found where the small intestine connects to the large intestine. It is located above the appendix in the lower right side of the abdomen. When this valve does not function properly a host of gastrointestinal problems and other problems including heart symptoms, blood pressure problems, and even migraines can result. Massaging the valve will encourage proper function.

How to Massage the Ileocecal Valve:
  • To locate the ileocecal valve area (its placement can vary slightly for each person), place your left thumb on your navel, your right thumb on your right hip (the high part of your pelvic bone). Imagine a line connecting those two points and find the middle of that line.


  • Place all your fingers 3 inches below the middle of that line and you should be close to the ileocecal valve.


  • With all of your fingers, press in FIRMLY and find the tender spot. This area will be tender in 90% of people. It will be like finding a golf ball under a pillow - but some of us have more 'pillow' than others so keep palpating to locate the spot. (Palpate means to press in slowly but deeply to feel for hardened or tender areas.)


  • Sometimes it is easier to locate the tender spot while lying down. Using some coconut oil may also enable you to find it more easily. Once you've found it, massage it in a circular fashion as you would any cramped muscle. Massage with medium pressure, in a rotary motion for five seconds. Then using a closed fist, briskly stimulate reflex area (right upper arm) for 10 seconds - yes, that is your upper arm.


  • Ideally, this massage should be done 3 times a day before meals. At the least do it in bed before going to sleep and in the morning before you get out of bed.

After all, the whole digestive tract from the throat to the rectum is a muscular tube — and any section can cramp, get 'Charlie horses,' become too weak to function, etc. Some people experience gurgling, flatulence, burping, or other sounds during or after this massage and sometimes a bowel movement will follow.

All of these are evidence that the ileocecal valve needs help. You'll find that the tenderness will subside after about a week or two of diligent application of this technique, and you'll feel much better and be healthier for it.

Do the same massage for the rest of the colon:
  • Massage upward from the ileocecal valve and toward the ribs where the ascending colon lies.
  • Then go across the belly above the navel to the opposite rib, then down the left side, winding up on the opposite side of the abdomen from the ileocecal valve.

This firm deep massage encourages proper bowel function. Learn where your tender or hardened areas are and continue this massage daily until these resolve. This whole massage can be done through the clothing but take time to locate all of the tender spots. You'll be healthier for it.